Mar 05

The Accelerated Producer Intensive™- “Send Us Your Rookie & We’ll Send You Back a Warrior”

Get ready for

The Accelerated Producer Intensive

The NEW 3-Day Workshop brought to you by National E&S

 

“Not Getting The Sales Results
From Your Producers You’d Hoped?

 

Don’t Have The Time
To Train & Manage Them Yourself?

 

Send Us Your Rookie,
& We’ll Send You Back A Warrior!”

 

Money Back Guarantee (See below)

phil 236x300 The Accelerated Producer Intensive™  Send Us Your Rookie & Well Send You Back a Warrior

Phil Beakes, VP Sales National E&S

Producers can only achieve sales results when they have the right tools and the right mindset. This workshop gives your producers a proven blueprint for success, based on the one I used for my agency, and refined over time to develop successful, viable producers quickly. The Accelerated Producer Intensive is designed to launch your producers to the next level of action and results.

  • Do you have a consistent flow of new clients and prospects that fit your ideal client profile?
  • Have you made the right hires and KNOW they are suited to win, or are you “waiting” for incredibly expensive time to pass to make that decision?
  • Are your producers trained hard on the “street smart” tactics that only the best know?
  • When a prospective client asks your producer “why should I do business with you?”, do they have an answer that is meaningful to them and compels them to buy from you?
  • Do you have the time, or the skills, or the proven blueprint to coach and mentor your producers into independent success that can come only from a focused effort?
  • Are the agency and the producers engaged in proven forceful marketing tactics to support sales?

 If not, you’re leaving highly profitable and easily attainable money on the table. You can’t achieve the commission growth you’re planning with producers who don’t have the tools they need, and aren’t motivated to get the job done RIGHT NOW! The solution is the Accelerated Producer Intensive™. Read the rest of this entry »

Jan 25

Business Personal Property and Inland Marine Coverage Discussion for the Restoration Professional

toxic 198x300 Business Personal Property and Inland Marine Coverage Discussion for the Restoration ProfessionalMost restoration contractors will have a General Liability and Pollution policy which provides protection to them from third parties in the event some third party alleges negligence against them. Business Personal Property (Contents) coverage provides first party coverage for the contractor’s contents at his office location. Examples would include computers, desks, phone systems, computers, and cleaning systems that do not go to job sites. It is important to place an accurate value on the items that never leave the office for the business personal property coverage.

Inland Marine coverage includes contractor equipment floaters and bailees coverage. An equipment floater provides coverage for the contractor’s tools and equipment away from their office and taken to job sites. An example of this would be tools, equipment, air movers, dehumidifiers, thermal imaging cameras, etc. Many times I will see a contractor who is way over insured on the business personal property limit and carrying no type of inland marine coverage. Many times I also find them grossly underinsured on their contents as well as inland marine if they even have any inland marine coverage.

 

Read the rest of this entry »

Aug 27

Avoiding The Dreaded “HAMMER CLAUSE”

I have recently seen contractor pollution policies and contractor professional liability policies that contain the dreaded “hammer clause,” which compels an insured to comply with an insurer’s decision to settle a case rather than fight it out in court. Some insurance carriers also call this the “cooperation clause,” as it forces insureds to settle a claim they normally would choose to fight.

Most policies give the insured the right to withhold consent to a proposed insurance settlement. However, the insurer may wish to be more competitive on its pricing to increase its sales and limit its liability on large liability losses. In this case, the insurer may wish to insert a hammer clause into its policy forms.

To read more click here.

May 06

Sampling of Environmental Losses in Buildings

mold 300x239 Sampling of Environmental Losses in BuildingsLong Island apartment tenants forced out – mold remediation expected to cost millions for
Archstone-Smith
A resident of a water-damaged apartment complex filed a lawsuit Wednesday against the property owner, saying that the Archstone Westbury’s “water intrusion problems” and reported mold and mildew made her sick and damaged her property, according to court documents. Andrea Sorrentino, a business executive, had signed a 26-month lease for a $3,000-a-month, two-bedroom, two-bathroom apartment at the mixed-income complex at 1299 Corporate Dr. and moved there in June 2005, said her attorney, Richard Cohen, of White Plains. Sorrentino learned of the water problems when parent company Archstone-Smith of Colorado sent letters on Tuesday to each tenant of the 400-unit complex, asking that they move out by March 31 so that renovation may begin. Newsday 11/28/07

Read the rest of this entry »

Apr 29

Why Contractors Need Environmental Insurance

air force pollution 45 600x450 300x225 Why Contractors Need Environmental InsuranceNo matter how careful you are, you can never eliminate all exposure to hazardous materials or waste on
construction jobsites. Improving quality control, material handling procedures, conducting site surveys, and updating work policies can help prevent accidents and exposure and improve work site health and safety, but these steps alone may not be enough to protect your clients. You should be concerned about the financial impact of lawsuits against your clients, it would be a wise business decision to investigate environmental insurance and weigh the costs against the potential damage from litigation.

 

Read the rest of this entry »

Apr 23

Plumbers and HVAC Pollution Liability Exposures

plumber Plumbers and HVAC Pollution Liability ExposuresToday’s plumbing or HVAC professional is assuming risks that were previously covered by their general liability policies. Insurance carriers today routinely insert pollution, asbestos, lead, microbial matter (mold) and bacteria exclusions into their policies. These exclusions were being added over the last 8 years as insurance carriers were paying claims for the above exposures they never intended to cover. Insurance companies develop new exclusions when they start getting losses they never originally contemplated. Plumbers and HVAC contractors are the new targets of the attorneys who routinely sue fire/water restoration contractors. The need for pollution insurance arose for this group when the pollution exclusions were put into their policies. Lawyers started suing for mold, then lead and asbestos. Read the rest of this entry »

Jan 07

ADDITIONAL INSURED ENDORSEMENT CONSIDERATIONS FOR GENERAL & RESTORATION CONTRACTORS

As a licensed general contractor and surplus lines insurance broker myself, many ordinary insurance brokers and their general contractors we have routinely insure have asked us for guidance with their own risk management.  These clients all know I am a General Contractor myself and have asked me how I managed risks with my own construction company over the years. Read the rest of this entry »

Nov 01

Understanding the Dreaded “Hammer Clause” and its impact on Restoration Contractors and Additional Insureds

Hammer 300x273 Understanding the Dreaded “Hammer Clause” and its impact on Restoration Contractors and Additional InsuredsI have recently seen contractor pollution policies and contractor professional liability policies that contain the dreaded “hammer clause”.   Some insurance carriers also call this the “cooperation clause”  as it forces insureds to make difficult choices they normally would not agree to in the event of a loss.  This is something not yet seen in the restoration contractor class of business and has caused us some concern as the vast majority of carriers in this class of business do not have hammer clauses.

The hammer clause is usually found in many types of professional liability and directors & officer’s liability policies.  One usually finds hammer clauses in professional liability policies for physicians, surgeons, attorneys, CPA’s, etc.

Most policies give the insured the right to consent or withhold consent to a proposed insurance settlement.   The insurer may wish to be me more competitive on its pricing to increase its sales and limit its liability on large liability losses.  In this case, the insurer may wish to insert a hammer clause into its policy forms.

Read the rest of this entry »

Jul 28

Everything you want to know Pollution Liability For Plumbers & HVAC

We are offering a free 20 instructional video minute video for free as a training resource for insurance agencies. We discuss everything you want to know about contractor pollution liability for plumbers and HVAC risks.  We discuss asbestos, lead, mold and other pollutants in detail in the video.  We also discuss claims made vs. occurrence as well as prior acts coverage (nose coverage) and extended reporting periods (tail coverage).  We have also included some claims examples.  We will be creating free content in the future on a number of different subjects for you to share with your staff to train them or as a sales tool for you to use with your insureds.

Jul 11

Why Restoration Contractors Need Professional Liability

lead paint removal 300x200 Why Restoration Contractors Need Professional LiabilityI am continuously asked why restoration contractors should carry professional liability insurance.

Professional liability should be carried by those who prepare reports or provide opinions that others rely on.

“Professional Liability coverage can be offered along with CPL to many non-environmental contractors (general contractors, restoration contractors, construction managers, or specialty contractors) performing project management, plan review, field modifications, contractor and subcontractor selection, scheduling and sequencing services.”

I have had claims where our insured is a restorer and is asked by an adjuster to do a “bid comp” for them.  The adjuster has a scope and pricing put together and the property owner has a contractor not using Xactimate, who does not do insurance work, write a scope of repairs that is on the moon.  Our insured prepares an estimate for the adjuster, may charge him a fee, and is willing to do the job at a set price plus supplementals as the job dictates may be needed. Read the rest of this entry »

Older posts «